Book Review: The Clockmaker’s Daughter by Kate Morton


This novel takes you on a multi-character multi-timeline adventure, and will leave you in awe of the author’s ability to weave a complex and engrossing tale.

It took me over 100 pages to really “get into” this story.  The changes in the time period and character points-of-view threw me for a while and it took some time to really find myself in the story.

However, after I started seeing the different story lines flow together I was totally entrapped and couldn’t wait to see how the story ended.  If you like suspense, mystery, paranormal stories, or emotionally complex characters – this book is for you.

Purchase your copy here.

Back Cover Copy of The Clockmaker’s Daughter:

In the summer of 1862, a group of young artists led by the passionate and talented Edward Radcliffe descends upon Birchwood Manor in rural Oxfordshire. Their plan: to spend a secluded summer month in a haze of inspiration and creativity. But by the time their stay is over, one woman has been shot dead while another has disappeared; a priceless heirloom is missing; and Edward Radcliffe’s life is in ruins. 

Over 150 years later, Elodie Winslow, a young archivist in London, uncovers a leather satchel containing two seemingly unrelated items: a sepia photograph of an arresting-looking woman in Victorian clothing, and an artist’s sketchbook containing the drawing of a twin-gabled house on the bend of a river. 

Why does Birchwood Manor feel so familiar to Elodie? And who is the beautiful woman in the photograph? Will she ever give up her secrets? 

Told by multiple voices across time, The Clockmaker’s Daughter is a story of murder, mystery and thievery, of art, love and loss. And flowing through it like a river is the voice of a woman who stands outside time, whose name has been forgotten by history but who has watched it all unfold: Birdie Bell, the clockmaker’s daughter.

About Kate Morton:

Kate Morton is an award-winning, New York Times bestselling author. Her novels – The House at Riverton, The Forgotten Garden, The Distant Hours, The Secret Keeper, The Lake House and The Clockmaker’s Daughter – are published in over 40 countries, in 34 languages, and have all been number one bestsellers around the world.

Kate Morton grew up in the mountains of southeast Queensland and now lives with her family in London and Australia. She has degrees in dramatic art and English literature, and harbored dreams of joining the Royal Shakespeare Company until she realised that it was words she loved more than performing. Kate still feels a pang of longing each time she goes to the theatre and the house lights dim.

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